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About Communication Studies

Communication Studies has been at the heart of the Liberal Arts since the beginning of higher education in the West some 2,500 years ago. When the Greeks began studying the Liberal Arts, the very first subject that they focused on was rhetoric, what we now would call communication. They began with the study of communication because they knew that when people exist in a community of any kind, the three most basic skills that they need are the ability to listen to what someone else says and judge whether their comments are sensible and to devise a response. What was true 2,500 years ago is still true today. If anything, the rise of the internet makes the study of communication more important than it has been at any other point in human history.

 

 


Calendar of Events
Advising Information

Advising for summer 2014 and fall 2014
(March 24 – April 11)
More info (PDF)

Colloquium Series
Departmental Awards

Communication Studies Department Awarded Inaugural Chancellor's Doctoral Fellowship!
More Info

If you are on campus and have the time tomorrow, consider going to The Commons to hear Dr. Lang speak!
Kansas African Studies Center
Tomorrow: What's Happening in Ferguson, Missouri Clarence Lang KU Associate Professor of American Studies and African & African-American Studies 12:00-1:00pm Tuesday, August 26 The Commons Sponsored by the Office of Multicultural Affairs and Student Union Activities Clarence Lang will begin the discussion by talking about the history of St. Louis, including racial tension and political unrest. His introduction will provide a platform from which to start a dialogue among audience members about policy, community, and the impact of recent events in Ferguson, Missouri.

Yesterday we introduced you to KU professor Rolfe Mandel. Watch this video to learn more about his #KUdiscoveries : http://t.co/lTYBdqqmCM
KU ODYSSEY team digs for clues to ancient Pleistocene people Searching for evidence of early people living on the plains in the late Pleistocene age, (see http://bit.ly/1li6uYX) Rolfe Mandel, a KU distinguished professor of anthropology, led an excavation in July 2014 in the “Coffey Site” along the Big Blue River bank in Pottawatomie County, Kansas. Mandel says artifacts from Pleistocene period sediments could provide more clues about the Clovis and pre-Clovis people, who were the founding inhabitants of the Americas.


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